Website Validator Buttons

W3C has an incredibly useful group of Validators, but there isn’t a universal button for checking HTML5 yet. I took it upon myself to try to fix this, because the path below is unwieldy, especially if you’re using a trackpad instead of a mouse.

thispath

I photoshopped the HTML4 button to show HTML5. While  you have to set it to a specific page to validate (instead of a universal piece of code you can slap on the bottom of any web page), I think it will be very useful. At least, until W3C creates a Validator for HTML5, then I’ll use their universal code.

Note! I left the href intentionally blank in the first half of code. The URL that you will insert there will be at the bottom of your successful HTML5 validation page under “Linking to this result”.

Also, the source for the first image will be within the folder you place it, so make sure it has the right path and name!

valid-html50-blue

<p>
<a href=”      “>
<img style=”border:0;width:88px;height:31px”
src=”images/valid-html50-blue.png”
alt=”Valid HTML 5.0!” /></a>

<a href=”http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/check/referer”&gt;
<img style=”border:0;width:88px;height:31px”
src=”http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/images/vcss-blue&#8221;
alt=”Valid CSS!” /></a>
</p>

“Gifted” kids do not, in fact, have all the fun.

If an average student got a B, it was cause for celebration, but if I got an A I was simply meeting expectations.

This attitude really sticks in my craw. When my elementary classmates [who weren’t “gifted”] got A’s, their parents rewarded them; some got money, some got a special meal. I know, because they would brag about it the next day at school. When I got an A, my parents said, “Oh, good.” I merely met their expectations. “Checkmark, our kid is maintaining the expected average. Back to the news on the TV.” It made me feel that my grades didn’t matter, that I didn’t matter.

My parents often told me the standard line, “You don’t have to be the best, you just have to try your best.” Hah, what a joke. When “my best” wasn’t an A, The Inquisition™ always happened. What did I do incorrect? Did I study the wrong material? Was I slacking? On and on and on.

In high school algebra I got my first B, and I cried for hours. Obviously, there was something wrong with me. There was no way it couldn’t be my fault; no matter that the teacher didn’t like me, nor that my previous maths didn’t prepare me. I had to be deficiant, somehow.

It was a revelation when I learned in college how “normal people” study. Just the minimum? How did they expect to pass anything? Then I tried it. Suddenly I had free time. I could read, or play on the computer, or anything. Since I always took copious notes in lecture, I had my studying already done.

It’s ridiculous, my grad program is entirely online, and I’ve never studied less in my life. I can read, hang out with friends, go dancing, and spend hours online if I so desire.

“Gifted” kids reading this: I implore you, don’t study more, study smarter. Find a studying method that works for you but also lets you live, and don’t take shit from anyone. Younger me was miserable. Don’t be younger me. Please. Be someone that future you won’t pity.

Parents of “gifted” kids reading this: ease up on the whip. Thanks.